Linked Readings

Chapter One

1. To enjoy personal expressive writing with a poetic style: Williams, Terry Tempest.
“Why I Write.” 1998. Why I Write: A Celebration of the National Day on Writing.
National Writing Project, 2011.
rvannoy.asp.radford.edu/rvn/312/whyiwrite.pdf

2. To consider motivation in school writing and to appreciate accessible academic research: Strasser, Emily. “Writing What Matters: A Student’s Struggle to Bridge the Academic/Personal Divide.” Young Scholars in Writing, vol. 5, 2007.
https://arc.lib.montana.edu/ojs/index.php/Young-Scholars-In-Writing/article/view/238/167

3. To explore accessible scholarly research about the kinds of academic assignments students find meaningful: Eodice, Michele, Anne Ellen Geller, and Neal Lerner. The Meaningful Writing Project: Learning, Teaching, and Writing in Higher Education. Conference on College Composition and Communication Research Grant, 2010–11.
http://meaningfulwritingproject.net

4. To hear how a thoughtful writing professor connects our everyday lives to our classroom work: Cusick, Christine. “Reflections on Teaching.” Assay: A Journal of Nonfiction Studies, 29 Jan. 2018.
https://assayjournal.wordpress.com/2018/01/29/christine-cusick-reflections-on-teaching/

5. To trace how a student researcher journeys from wondering whether texting has a negative effect on student writing to finding answers to her question: Cullington, Michaela. “Texting and Writing.” Young Scholars in Writing: Undergraduate Research in Writing and Rhetoric, vol. 8, 2011, pp. 90–95.
https://arc.lib.montana.edu/ojs/index.php/Young-Scholars-In-Writing/article/view/164/116

6. To see how one scholar might respond to another in a public venue: Cooper, Julia. “A Response to Michaela Cullington.” Young Scholars in Writing, vol. 11, 2014, pp. 91–93.
https://arc.lib.montana.edu/ojs/index.php/Young-Scholars-In-Writing/article/view/283/210

 

Chapter Two

1. To consider story, narrative, and argument as persuasive and rhetorical moves in an accessible essay: Christiansen, Ron. “Story as Rhetorical: We Can’t Escape Story No Matter How Hard We Try.” Rhetoric: How We Examine Writing in the World.
https://openenglishatslcc.pressbooks.com/chapter/story-as-rhetorical-we-cant-escape-story-no-matter-how-hard-we-try/

2. To think about familiar genres of school writing in a series of thoughtful research articles by students: “Tag: Classroom Genres.” Grassroots Writing Research, Illinois State University.
http://isuwriting.com/tag/classroom-genres/

3. To better understand how dialects can be—but shouldn’t be—used to promote stereotypes: “Why Do People Say ‘AX’ instead of ‘ASK’?” Decoded, MTV, 17 Jan. 2018, YouTube.
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=l-VnitbeS6w

4. To engage a student research project about how learning in a first-year writing course may (or may not) transfer to other rhetorical situations: Mulcahy, Sara. “‘I Realize Writing Is a Part of My Daily Life Now’: A Case Study of Writing Knowledge Transfer in One Section of ESL Writing.” Young Scholars in Writing: Undergraduate Research in Writing and Rhetoric, vol. 10, 2012.
https://arc.lib.montana.edu/ojs/index.php/Young-Scholars-In-Writing/article/view/194

5. To realize how writing can vary from one culture to the next in ways that go far deeper than language: Writing across Borders, parts 1, 2, and 3, Oregon State U, YouTube, May 2010.
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=quI0vq9VFc&list=PL17u1gFU9b8SgVMrsVYMrHdoeM5WQYdKH

6. To enjoy noticing lexis (a vocabulary associated with a discourse community) within family communities: Golder, Andy. “People Are Sharing Words that Only Their Family Uses, And It’s Hilariously Relatable.” Buzzfeed, 13 January 2018.
https://www.buzzfeed.com/andyneuenschwander/people-are-sharing-words-thatonly-their-family-us?utm_term=.awr2KBBvlr#.bmExJjjZp3

7. To notice how discourse communities operate within movie plots: “Discourse Communities in Movie Clips.” YouTube, 28 January 2018.
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=pS6zJ7IsJkM&list=PL2auNWo91Io0DvgfRST-H9q50XI7WhL8s

 

 Chapter Three

1. To consider the role of music in the writing process and appreciate the work of a student researcher: Calicchia, Sara. “To ‘Play That Funky Music’ or Not: How Music Affects the Environmental Self-Regulation of High-Ability Academic Writers.” Young Scholars in Writing, vol. 11, 2014.
https://arc.lib.montana.edu/ojs/index.php/Young-Scholars-In-Writing/article/view/278

2. For an argument about how grammar should be taught that relies on academic research but is written for a non-academic public audience: Cleary, Michelle Navarre. “The Wrong Way to Teach Grammar.” The Atlantic 25 Feb. 2014.
http://www.theatlantic.com/education/archive/2014/02/the-wrong-way-to-teach-grammar/284014/

3. To see an example of how students can research actual writing processes in their own university: McMillan, Laurie. “Informal Local Research Aids Student and Faculty Learning.” Council on Undergraduate Research On the Web, vol. 33, no. 1, 2012.
http://www.cur.org/assets/1/7/331Fall12McMillanWeb.pdf

4. For a brief and vivid blog post that provides a lesson on sentence style (I know it sounds boring, but it’s really cool!): Ciotti, Gregory. “Easy Reading Is Damn Hard Writing.” Help Scout, 3 Sept 2015.
https://www.helpscout.net/blog/damn-hard-writing/

5. To have a lot of fun thinking about rules and voice via a student’s creative honor’s thesis: Tyrrell, Lauren E. “Excuse My Excess.” Xchanges, vol. 6,no. 1, 2010.
http://www.xchanges.org/xchanges_archive/xchanges/6.1/tyrrell/tyrrell.html

6. To hear video advice about acting as beta readers (general rather than expert readers) for one another: Moreci, Jenna. “All about Beta Readers.” Jenna Moreci, YouTube, 9 Aug 2017.
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Ziykw0SmKoE&index=9&list=PLZKiZgsbgCyl1zeAGHk_U2enfc1suFsdG

7. For a video of students reflecting on their writing processes in college: Sommers, Nancy. Shaped by Writing, 2003, Harvard College, YouTube, 2014.
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=rTOZqa__hVA

 

Chapter Four

1. To consider the ethics and processes of primary research in a friendly form: Driscoll, Dana Lynn. “Introduction to Primary Research: Observations, Surveys, and Interviews.” Writing Spaces: Readings on Writing, Vol. 2. Parlor P, 2011.
http://writingspaces.org/sites/default/files/driscoll–introduction-to-primary-research.pdf

2. For an accessible and practical explanation of secondary research: Haller, Cynthia R. “Walk, Talk, Cook, Eat: A Guide to Using Sources.” Writing Spaces: Readings on Writing, Vol. 2. Parlor P, 2011.
http://writingspaces.org/sites/default/files/haller-walk-talk-cook-eat.pdf

3. To think about research and writing as conversational in terms of honest student experiences: O’Rourke, Sean Patrick, Stephen Howard, and Andrianna Lee Lawrence. “Respondeo etsi Mutabor: The Comment and Response Assignment, Young Scholars, and the Promise of Liberal Education.” Young Scholars in Writing: Undergraduate Research in Writing and Rhetoric 10 (2012).
https://arc.lib.montana.edu/ojs/index.php/Young-Scholars-In-Writing/article/view/192/129

4. For a student perspective on reading academic journals intended for professors rather than students: Wojciechowski, Kylie. “Eavesdropping on the Conversation: Situating an Undergraduate’s Role within the Scope of Academic Journals.” Grassroots Writing Research Journal, vol. 5, no. 1, 2014, pp. 67–77.
http://isuwriting.com/wp-content/uploads/2015/03/Eavesdropping-on-the-Conversation.pdf

5. To hear a teacher reflect on the difficulties of teaching students to navigate library databases in a brief accessible article written for other teachers: Fister, Barbara. “Burke’s Parlor Tricks: Introducing Research as Conversation.” Inside Higher Ed, 11 Nov. 2011.
https://www.insidehighered.com/blogs/library-babel-fish/burkes-parlor-tricks-introducing-research-conversation

6. For an array of resources based on research of students’ use and citation of sources: Jamieson, Sandra, Rebecca Moore Howard, and Tricia Serviss. The Citation Project: Preventing Plagiarism, Teaching Writing.
http://citationproject.net

7. For case studies of how internet searches are used for academic projects in a creative online publication: Purdy, James P., and Joyce R. Walker. “Digital Breadcrumbs: Case Studies of Online Research.” Kairos, vol. 11, no. 2, spring 2007.
http://kairos.technorhetoric.net/11.2/topoi/purdy-walker/index.htm

8. To view information from a plenary talk on how people are using libraries, books, and online research: Zickhur, Kathryn. “Reading, Writing, and Research in the Digital Age.” Pew Research Center, 4 Nov. 2013.
http://www.pewinternetorg/2013/11/04/reading-writing-and-research-in-the-digital-age/

 

Chapter Five 

1. For interesting and accessible research about the rhetoric of font: Stewart, Nida M., “Typeface and Document Persona in Magazines.” Xchanges, vol. 6, no. 1, 2010.
http://www.xchanges.org/xchanges_archive/xchanges/6.1/stewart/stewart.html

2. For helpful, clear advice on blogging and other forms of web writing: Barton, Matt, James Kalmbach, and Charles Lowe, eds. Writing Spaces: Web Writing Style Guide Version 1.0. Parlor P, 2011.
http://writingspaces.org/sites/default/files/web-writing-style-guide-1.0.pdf

3. To view and learn the background of a variety of student multimodal projects: Shipka, Jody. Remediate This, Blog.
http://remediatethis.com/student/index.html

4. To explore famous American speeches (often with transcripts and video in addition to audio): American Rhetoric.
http://www.americanrhetoric.com

5. To see student-made videos which teach a principle for communication theory in a fun way: Wotanis, Lindsey. Teach-a-Theory Videos, YouTube playlist, 7 February 2016.
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=W2PKKs-lTEU&list=PL6pHoX6ATqfPb8jH6bah77LIJJPxsNcJu

6. For a thoughtful and visually engaging video about multimodal composing: Andrews, Kendra L., illustrated by T. Mark Bentley. “Multimodal Composing, Sketchnotes, and Idea Generation.” Kairos, vol. 22, no. 2, spring 2018.
http://kairos.technorhetoric.net/22.2/disputatio/andrews/index.html

7. For a helpful view of current writing technologies in terms of a long history of development and change: Baron, Denis. “From Pencils to Pixels: The Stages of Literacy Technology.” Adapted from a chapter in Passions, Pedagogies, and 21st Century Technologies, edited by Gail Hawisher and Cynthia Selfe, Utah State UP and NCTE, 2000, pp. 15–33.
http://www.english.illinois.edu/-people-/faculty/debaron/essays/pencils.htm